Saturday, May 2, 2015

HOW TO CONDUCT A LOCATION SPECIFIC SEARCH ON FAMILY SEARCH

FamilySearch and the FamilySearch logo are trademarks of Genealogical Society of Utah

Maybe you’ve used this site for years.  Perhaps you are new to genealogy and have only recently begun using this site?  There are usually many methods used by genealogists to get the most from their searches.  We learn these over time, by trial and error or from someone else with more experience.

This is the method I use when I want to search a specific set of records on Family Search.  Whether you want to search in one of the 50 states, Canada, Europe or Asia, the method is the same.

From the home page, click on “Search” and then “Records.”

You will see this screen (Click on any image to enlarge it)

FS screen 1

Now go to the map and hover over an area you want to search.  You will see that the areas will change from grey to yellow.  Click on the yellow area you want to search.

I chose the United States and this is how my screen now looks:

FS -2

Once you click on that yellow area you will see a drop down list with all the locations for that area.  In this case all 50 states.  I chose Michigan and this is what I see.

Michigan records on familysearch

Next I selected “Start researching in Michigan.”

You will see the screen shown below.  Notice that only a few records are shown on the list at the bottom.  I want to see all the Michigan records, so I select “Show all 58 Collections.”  This will take you to a complete list.

FS-3 michigan records

Here is a sample of a portion of that complete list.  As you can see you can use the boxes on the left of the record collection to select only one or several of the collections in which to conduct your search.

 FS - 4
Here are the things you learn from viewing this complete list:
  • Which records are available
  • How many records are in the collection
  • When the collection was last updated
  • Whether the collection has images or not (by the little camera on the right of the last column)
As you scroll down this page the next thing you will see is a list of the Michigan Image Only Historical Records.  This means there is no index for these records and you must browse the entire collection page by page.  Again, you see how many images are in the collection and when it was last updated.

FS-5

This is an excellent way to check the site from time to time and see what collections have been recently updated.  Maybe it’s time to go back and look through the collection again?

TIP:  Make use of the Wiki on this site.  You find it from the home page, by clicking on “search” and then “wiki” in the dropdown list.  I went to the Wiki and put in the word Michigan.  Then I selected “Military Records.”  What I got was an incredible list of resources, links and information.  Since it is too long for me to include on this page, here is the link so you can see what I’m talking about https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Michigan_Military_Records

Another great resource for finding specific records is Cyndi’s List.  You can search the site alphabetically and she has, as of this date, 333,397 links.  The site is constantly being updated.
I hope you’ve found this post helpful.

OTHER POSTS THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST
Family Search - Going back & getting those other pages

How to Find Probate Records Online

Happy hunting,

Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Friday, May 1, 2015

FRIDAY FACES FROM THE PAST–Orphaned Photos–Can we find their families?


This post comes from a wonderful idea I found via Pinterest, which took me to the blog Cousin Linda.  She rescues old photos just like I do.

Whenever my friends and I are browsing an antique store or flea market I look for old photos.  Seeing boxes of photos sitting unclaimed breaks my heart.  I always try to save a couple of them.  I only purchase the ones that have names on them, as I feel those have the better chance of finding their descendants.

Please see the update at the end of this post.

Let’s begin with one photo today.

WHERE THIS PHOTO WAS PURCHASED:
Grand Avenue Antiques
140 N. Glassell
Orange, CA. 92866
714-538-3540
www.grandavenueantiques.com

Carrie Burman
Carrie Burman - full view - Copy

Full view of back of photo card (click on any image to enlarge it)

Complete back of picture folder

On the back of the photo itself is the name Carrie Burman.  I had to use a magnifying glass to read the name, so it may not be clearly visible here.

Back of Carrie Burman picture showing her name_email size

The photographers stamp of this photo reads: F. W. Mueller, Waverly, IA

In a Google search it looks like this photographer was in business in the early 1900’s into the 1920’s.  A weekly photographers magazine states that F. W. Mueller opened a new branch in Allison, Iowa in 1922.  And, I see references to earlier photos by this studio.

I post these old photos on Dead Fred’s (clicking on the link will take you to the entry for Carrie Burman). This site has been around for many years and is, I believe, an underused resource.

UPDATE - When I posted this photo today I had forgotten that back in 2011 I was contacted by someone who said Carrie Burman was their family member.  They had me scan the photo and send it to them.  From there, I never knew what happened. There is a very happy ending, as you can find Carrie attached to a family tree on Ancestry by clicking on this link http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14147454/person/77420000?pgnum=1  Rather than take this post down, I have chosen to add this update.   

Stay tuned for more orphaned photos featured on this blog.
 
My goal is to reunite these photos with family.  

OTHER POSTS THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST
MYSTERY MONDAY - UNIDENTIFIED FAMILY PHOTOS

Happy hunting,
Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Friday, April 24, 2015

FAMILY RECIPE FRIDAY–Eggs baked in gravy

woman in kitchen

My grandmother, Florence Bowden Milne left us a spiral bound notebook, written entirely by hand.  The notebook was begun about the time of her marriage to my grandfather, Joseph A. Milne in 1906.  In it she left a treasure chest of family information and wonderful clues to life back in the early 1900's.
TODAY'S FEATURED RECIPE
EGGS BAKED IN GRAVY
Eggs baked in gravy_enhanced
The excerpt from my grandmother's journal - in her handwriting

Here is a transcription of the recipe.

Take chicken gravy, making it thin and season well.  Put it into a baking dish and drop into it as many eggs as will cover the bottom of the dish.  Sprinkle bread crumbs over the top and bake in a hot oven.  Serve on sliced toast.

I’ve personally never heard of this dish, nor have I tried this recipe.  However, it does sound interesting.  Maybe I’ll give this recipe a try.  Wonder if my husband will like it?  What do you think?  Would you try it?

So many of the things written by my grandmother, in this notebook, are interesting and unusual.  I’m sure glad I have this memory from her.

OTHER POSTS THAT MY BE OF INTEREST

Happy hunting,
Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

WEDDING WEDNESDAY–Ortell & Warchol - 1908


wedding bells

LADISLAUS “WALTER” ORTELL & SOPHIE WARCHOL
ORTELL_Walter & WARCHOL_Sophie_wedding picture_cropped & enh

Walter and Sophie Ortell are the grandparents to my 2nd cousins on the Lindsay side of our family.  Walter & Sophie had 11 children: John, Chester, Helen, Mary, Adolph, Ladislaus, Alois, Henry, Bernice, Anthonia and Eleanore.

Here is a family view from my Legacy database. Please click on image to enlarge it.



My cousins are doing the research on this part of the family.
 
However, if you think you might be related to anyone mentioned here, please contact me and I will get in touch with them.

Happy hunting,
Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Saturday, April 18, 2015

ARE YOU GETTING OFF TRACK? Losing your focus?


Image result for free cartoon photos of train tracks going in circles
Image result for free cartoon photos of train tracks going in circles
Image result for free cartoon photos of train tracks going in circles
Do you feel like you go around in circles sometimes?  Are you just playing at staying on track and organized, or are you serious?  I had to ask myself these questions today and here's what got me started.


I was sorting things on my desk and saw the list of 33 Michigan Death Certificates I was able to locate when Seeking Michigan released new records in March of this year.  I even wrote two blog posts about how I made a list from my Legacy database before proceeding to the site to locate records.
 
Michigan Death Certificate Images Released - 1921-1939

And, then I wrote a second post about my procedure once I’ve located the death certificates.

Day Two of the Michigan Death Certificates Journey - Now What?

So, it’s not like I don’t know what to do. Right?  I added & cited a few of them.  But, then I stopped.  When I say few, I’m talking about 4 out of 33!

Why waste time locating records online, at libraries, at courthouses, from family members etc., if we don’t then record those records to our database?

Darn good question, I think.
 
Here are my examples of unfinished “business.”
  • Multiple trips to Michigan for research and to visit family and bringing home all sorts of photos and documents, many of which still sit in folders.
  • A trip to the Family History Library where myself and a friend spent 5 glorious days and I took hundreds of photographs of books & microfilm - still not all processed.
  • A trip to the local Carlsbad Library where they have wonderful genealogy resources and I found many and photographed them - most are not processed.
  • A trip to Ohio & West Virginia for one thing – genealogy research - still need to process some items.
  • And, of course, downloading the much awaited death certificates, saving them in proper file format on my computer and then DOING NOTHING with them.
I’m sure I could go on.  Am I the only one?  Do you also have this “problem?”

Maybe we are in too big a hurry to “find absolutely everything.”  It’s sure fun to find things.  All that finding does us absolutely NO GOOD if we don’t process what we locate.

There is currently a project begun by Thomas MacEntee called the “Genealogy Do Over.  Many people are participating and finding it very useful. 

I think what I’m going to do, right here and now, is to begin a type of “Do Over.”

HERE IS MY PLAN:

1.  If I get an email or other contact from a cousin, new or otherwise, I will respond to them, but tell them I will get back to them.  Then make a reminder in Evernote to do so.

2.  I’m going to finish adding & sourcing the rest of those 33 death certificates I found.  In doing so I will stay focused and make notes (in Evernote) of items I want to go back & find out more about.  The goal is to enter and source the death certificates, first & foremost.

3.  I will go through the plastic tub I have that has neatly organized surname folders where I have filed miscellaneous papers I’ve intended to go back to.  I no longer file in paper files, but these are from several years ago.

4.  I will go through every digital file I have from all the library research I have done and process that information.  When I was at the FHL I took over 500 digital photos from books and microfilm.  They are organized by state & county, but I’ve never gone through all of them.

5.  Only conduct research that is directly from these items.    
I think that this process will not only make me feel more organized and productive, but I suspect it will lead to many finds.
 
train tracks

CAN THIS PROCESS CAUSE ME TO GET HORRIBLY SIDETRACKED…OH MY YES!
BUT, I'M HOPING IT WON'T
  








How many of you have done something similar to this?
How many of you are participating in the Genealogy Do Over?  If so, has it helped?
Do you have other suggestions that we, as genealogists, can follow in order to avoid this sort of situation?

There is a wonderful group on Facebook called The Organized Genealogist.  With over 20,000 members there are lots of ideas presented about how to get and stay organized.

Wish me luck.  I sure hope that I’m successful and can get a lot of this work done.

OTHER POSTS THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST
DIGITAL FOLDER ORGANIZING & NAMING MADE EASY
EVERNOTE - A VERY USEFUL AND FREE TOOL TO HELP YOU ORGANIZE GENEALOGY AND EVERYTHING ELSE

Happy hunting & organizing,
Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

CIVIL WAR DEAD - ON THIS, THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE END OF THE CIVIL WAR–I honor those in our family who died during this conflict

Civil-War_02-630x310

There is so much being written right now about the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.  I'd like to honor those in our family who paid the ultimate sacrifice during this war.  I’m sure there are others in our family who also died during the conflict whom I just haven’t located or documented.
civilwar-flags
Here is our list:
FRAMPTON, Hiram – age 30 - died Jul 1864  - Prisoner of War
GILLEN, John – age 21 - died 31 Dec 1862  - Killed in action at Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee
HUMPHRIES, Richard F. – age 20 - Killed in action, probably in Spotsylvania, Virginia 1864
LUNSFORD, Pleasant –  age 22 - Killed in action at the Battle of Guyandotte 10 Nov 1861
McKNIGHT, Anthony – age 26 - Died of Typhoid Fever during his service on 2 Jul 1862

HEADSTONES
FRAMPTON_Hiram_headstone_1834-1864_BurlingtonGreenlawnCem_BurlingtonLawrenceOH
HIRAM FRAMPTON
GILLEN_John Pvt_1841-1862_StonesRiverNationalCem_Tennessee
JOHN GILLEN
HUMPHREYS_Richard F_headstone_1864_SpotsylvaniaConfederateCemetery_Spotsylvania Co VA
RICHARD HUMPHREYS

There were many of our family members who served during the Civil War and survived.  Some became sick during their service and died of their illnesses sometime after the war.

This was a terrible conflict that took 620,000 lives.  I know that most, if not all, of us have family who were affected by this war.
 
Please share your stories with me either on your own blog or a comment on this post.

OTHER POSTS THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST

Widow's Pension Files - Civil War Service
CIVIL WAR - How our country dealt with the aftermath
MYSTERY MONDAY - Where is the wreck of this Civil War era paddle steamer?

Happy hunting,
Michigan Girl
Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Monday, April 13, 2015

MYSTERY MONDAY - Who's Your Daddy? Brick Walls Post #3–Rev. Isaac C. Hunter 1798-1842

Green tree with Isaac C Hunter
This is the third post in my series about brick walls in our family. You can find the other posts here:

Mystery Monday-Who's Your Daddy-Post #1 - John C. Gould
Mystery Monday-Who's Your Daddy-Post #2-Robert Lee Bowden

Bio for Isaac C. Hunter
Rev. Isaac C. Hunter is my 3rd great grandfather on my mother’s side.  From all accounts he was born 30 Aug 1798 in Bellefonte, Mifflin, Pennsylvania.  By 1828 he had moved to Lawrence County, Ohio where he married Emily GILLEN on 11 Sept 1828.  They had 5 children: Susan, James, Martha, Isaac C. Jr. and John E.  Isaac was an itinerant preacher in the Ohio and Michigan territories.  He died 27 Jun 1842 in Gallipolis, Gallia, Ohio at age 43.

Finding any records in Pennsylvania in those early years is not easy.  I’ve not yet made a trip to Mifflin County.  However, I have been in contact with their historical society volunteers and they were not able to find anything about Isaac C. Hunter’s birth.
 
By the 1830 census we find Isaac C. Hunter living in Burlington, Lawrence, Ohio with his family.  In the 1840 census he and his family are in Perry, Pickaway, Ohio.
Here are those census records:

(CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO ENLARGE IT)
1830_HUNTER_Isaac C._Fayette-LawrenceOH 1840_HUNTER_Isaac C & family_Perry_Pickaway_Ohio
Rev. Isaac C. Hunter was a Methodist Episcopal Preacher.
Quite a lot has been written about the Rev. Isaac C. Hunter and his ministry.  He seems to have been quite well respected.

A history of his ministry:
·        Age 20 -  7 Aug 1819 – Admitted to trial to Methodist Episcopal ministry at the annual conference in Cincinnati, Ohio.  Appointed to the Beaver circuit.
·        Age 22-23 – about 1921 – Became a Deacon in the church
·        Age 23-24 – about 1823 – Became an Elder in the church
·        Age 24-43 – Was an itinerant preacher throughout the Ohio & Michigan territory
Here are some of the many documents I have regarding Rev. Isaac C. Hunter and his ministry. 
HUNTER_Article from Ironton Register Pg 1_1895-old time preachers
THESE FOUR PAGES ARE ARTICLES FROM THE IRONTON REGISTER IN OHIO
HUNTER_Article from Ironton Register Pg 2_1895-old time preachers HUNTER_Article from Ironton Register Pg 3_1895-old time preachers HUNTER_Article from Ironton Register Pg 4_1895-old time preachers

Hunter_Isaac C_Methodism In Gallipolis_Vol. 3, pg 210, Ohio History_Page_1
Methodism in Gallipolis
HUNTER_Isaac C_obiturary from Minutes of MethEpis Conf 1843
Obituary from Methodist Episcopal Conference 1843
HUNTER_Isaac C_record of death by M_Page_1
THESE NEXT FIVE PAGES ARE THE OBITUARY WRITTEN BY A FELLOW PREACHER
HUNTER_Isaac C_record of death by M_Page_2
HUNTER_Isaac C_record of death by M_Page_3
HUNTER_Isaac C_record of death by M_Page_4
HUNTER_Isaac C_record of death by M_Page_5
HUNTER_Isaac_article about his death from Western Christian Advocate_15 Jul 1842
ARTICLE ABOUT REV. ISAAC C. HUNTER IN THE WESTERN CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE - 1843

As you can see, I have quite a few publications and articles about my 3rd great grandfather, his ministry and his death.
Sadly, none of them mention his parents.
Here is the family group record in my Legacy database.

Legacy screeshot for Isaac C Hunter

 Some SURNAMES ASSOCIATED WITH Rev. Isaac C. Hunter
Boggs, Bridwell, Frampton, Gillen, Lunsford, Pope, Stover, Trail
 


It is difficult to locate records from the late 1700’s and early 1800’s in Pennsylvania.  Actually, it’s difficult in most states during that time period.  Church records can be a great help.  In this case, you'd think there would be a church record.  I have not exhausted all sources at this time and hope to continue this search at the FHL in June.

I have tried the following research methods to locate any possible records:

  • Searched land records and located one at the BLM land site for Isaac Connely Hunter in Ohio.  Certainly could be our Isaac C. Hunter, but I cannot prove it.
  • Searched the 1790 & 1800 census records for any Hunters in Mifflin or surrounding counties.  Located a couple of “possibles” but, again, have yet to find proof.
  • Googled “Isaac C. Hunter” and found several book references, but none mention his parents.
  • Posted message to online forums in Pennsylvania and Ohio on Genealogy.com
  • Searched the Mifflin County Historical Society webpage and located a few Hunter men, but have not connected them.
  • Looked through images of Ohio Probate Records 1789-1996 for Gallia, Journals & Wills 1831-1844 and 1841-1849 and found no Hunters.
What would you do next?
What have I missed, short of traveling to Mifflin County?
I welcome any and all suggestions from my very knowledgeable readers.

If you think you might be related, even remotely, to anyone mentioned in this blog, please contact me!

OTHER POSTS THAT YOU MAY FIND INTERESTING
SIBLING SATURDAY - The Hunter Sisters
DEATH CERTIFICATE OF Joseph Jackson Hunter - age 25

Happy hunting,
Michigan Girl
Copyright ©  2015   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION