Tuesday, August 4, 2020

TUESDAY'S TIP ~ Republishing my Ancestry tip - Watch out for that checked box - How I finally located the 1870 census for my 3rd great grandparents

I've been instructing new and experienced researchers how to use Ancestry lately.  This question has come up "what about the match all terms box?"  
Here's a good explanation of why we should be careful it's not checked.......all the time.


US fed census match all

I’ve been researching my Thorp family for the past 15 years.  This is a direct line for me and I want to learn as much as I can about them.  My Dad always talked about his paternal grandparents, William Val Gould and May Thorp Gould.  He called his grandmother Mema (pronounced Mee Ma).

During this research I was able to locate every census for my 3rd great grandparents, Monson Thorp, Sr. and his wife Lany Cooper Thorp…….except the 1870 census.  They married on 12 Apr 1835 in Cato, Cayuga, New York and had 6 children.  I located them in the 1840, 1850, 1860 and 1880 federal census records.   I also have several newspaper articles about Monson Thorp.  I have death certificates and wills for Monson and Lany.  From everything I found about them, they never left New York.

But, that 1870 census eluded me.

Yesterday, I was doing research for an upcoming blog post about their daughter Mary J. Thorp.  In doing so, I went yet again to those census records trying to find Monson and Lany in 1870.  While I was looking at census records for Mary J. Thorp, I decided to try once again to find Monson and Lany in 1870.

I’ve been doing this for over 15 years.  I’ve learned a LOT during that time.  I consider myself to be an experienced researcher, who is still learning every day.  I continue to attend seminars, conferences and classes each year to learn more.  We never stop learning.

I’m certain I have searched the census records using variations of Monson’s first and last name, along with variations for Lany.  Those names are often misspelled or transcribed incorrectly.  So, what was I doing wrong in my searches?

Had I done this exact search before?  Searched ONLY the 1870 census records?  Used this specific criteria?  I may never know, but it worked this time!!!!

I searched All Collections>Census and Voter Lists>US Federal Census Collection>1870 United States Federal Census and entered my criteria.

SPECIAL NOTE:  I kept screenshots after I made this find yesterday.  I just tried to reproduce the search and COULD NOT get it to come up with the result.  WHAT!  WHY?  I’ll tell you why, because up at the top of the search screen, next to the “search” icon is a box that says “Match all terms exactly.”  GUESS WHAT?  That box was checked by default.  Are you kidding me?  Every single time I went to the collections that “match all terms exactly” box is checked.  Yesterday, that box must have been unchecked for some reason. This means I need to go back to a LOT of my prior searches for other ancestors.

Back to my find.  Here’s the screen shot with the “match all terms exactly” unchecked.

THORP_search criteria

And, look what came up from my search.  ONE record and ONLY one.  Notice anything wrong with the surname spelling?  Regardless of that horrible misspelling, I knew this had to be my Munson.

THORP_search results

I selected the record and here is the index and access to the image.  The surname is wrong, (indexed as THERSSE), but all the green stars are correct for my ancestor and his wife Lany.

THORP_search results-2 - Copy

And finally the image.  Here they are at last.  Living right where I suspected they’d be, in Skaneateles, New York.

 Copy of 1870_THORP_Monson & Lany_SkaneatelesNY

My take a way from all of this is that darn check box.  Keep an eye out.  Maybe I’m the only one who didn’t think to look for that default “match all exactly.”  Did you know about it?

US fed census match all

If you have similar stories about having searched for a record for years and then having found it, I’d love to hear about it.

OTHER POSTS THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST

FOLLOWING LEADS ON ANCESTRY– One thing leads to another

OCCUPATION FILES ON ANCESTRY–1600-1995–What are they? Have you seen these?

Happy hunting,

Michigan Girl


Copyright ©  2010-2018   Diane Gould Hall

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

MAYFLOWER SOCIETY ~ Episode 6–I’M IN!


IT’S OFFICIAL – During the 400th anniversary year - I received an email from the California Historian, last evening at 5:20.  

My application has been approved by Plymouth!!

Talk about a happy dance  

Here’s the email I received from the California Mayflower Society historian, David.

Next step – Notify the San Diego Colony, if they haven’t already been notified.  They will officially add me as a member at a future meeting.  I prefer to have this done in person, rather than via Zoom, so I’ll wait.  I remember attending the meeting when my friend, Debby Warner Anderson was admitted to the colony.  I’m looking forward to it.

I’ve heard from another of the officials, today, that my certificate will be mailed to me.  Once I get it, I will be sharing it here on my blog.

I’m now a proud member of the DAR and the Mayflower Society.  What’s next?
 
Good question.  Those two memberships have always been on my “to do” list.  I have a LOT more ancestors to research and more than a few to find.  I will continue my research.  AND, I will likely begin another application process to add names to my membership in the Mayflower Society.  But, I will wait a year or so before going down that road.
 
To read about my entire journey, please click here Mayflower Society.

If you’ve been inspired by me or someone else to begin the application process, I’d love to hear about it in a comment or on your own blog.

Consider me “still smiling in Ramona”
Michigan Girl
Copyright ©  2010-2020   Diane Gould Hall
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

WEDDING WEDNESDAY ~ Marriage of my 6th great grandparents–William Lunsford & Rebeckah Basye in 1745


Today’s post is about my maternal 6th great grandparents, William Lunsford also spelled Lunceford and Rebeckah Basye.  I know very little about this couple.  I only recently added them as the parents of Reuben Lunsford (about 1769 to about 1845).  My hope is that someone seeing this post will exchange/share information with me about this couple and their family.

The marriage record I have for them is from Virginia, Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1649-1800.


I am descended from this couple as follows:

William Lunsford & Rebeckah Basye – 6th great grandparents

Reuben Lunsford & Mary Margaret Dennison – 5th great grandparents

John Lunsford & Mary “Polly” Sackville Hudson – 4th great grandparents

Nancy Delilah Lunsford & William Allen Boggs – 3rd great grandparents

Susan Caroline Boggs & James Gillen Hunter – 2nd great grandparents

Florence Hunter & Robert Edward Lee Bowden – great grandparents

Florence Lee Nora Bowden & Joseph Albert Milne – grandparents

Patricia Milne & Harry Norman Gould – parents

Me

On Ancestry you can place your DNA matches into groups.  I have created groups for my 8 great grandparents.  There are 298 matches in the LUNSFORD group.  And, that’s only the ones I’ve found so far.

Please get in touch if you are connected with the Lunsford line.  I always enjoy meeting new cousins and exchanging information.

I’ve written several other blog posts about my Lunsford line – you may read some of them by clicking on the links below:

CIVIL WAR PENSION RECORD FOR WILLIAM LUNSFORD - How I began my review and some of what I found

TREASURE CHEST THURSDAY - Birth Records for twins and others on one register page

SIBLING SATURDAY - 16 siblings - the children of John & Mary Lunsford

MILITARY MONDAY - Sgt. Presley Lunsford - Killed in Action during the Civil War - 1864

Happy hunting,

Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2010-2020   Diane Gould Hall

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

My First Webinar Presentation happened last Saturday ~ Thank you to my co-presenter Debby Warner Anderson and the San Diego Genealogical Society


What fun.  I am honored to have been asked by the San Diego Genealogical Society to prepare a presentation about the Mayflower Society.  They asked my good friend and fellow blogger Debby Warner Anderson and I if we would prepare a presentation together about our experiences in applying for and joining the Mayflower Society  

What could be better than working with a good friend?  Debby and I have presented together one other time, on a much smaller scale.  

The presentation took place last Saturday, July 11 at 10 a.m. pacific time.  Since our society isn’t meeting in person right now, we presented via Zoom. 

I have attended webinars and church services via Zoom, but never been a presenter using this venue.  I’ve done quite a few classes in person, so this was a new experience.  However, since Debby has had to use Zoom for her work, she was quite comfortable with it.  (Side note – she retired on July 1st – Congratuations to her!)

The topic for our presentation was:

The Mayflower Society

Have you ever wondered what the Mayflower Society is all about?  How to find your Mayflower passenger ancestor, the application process, the events, the costumes?  This presentation will take you on our journeys as we researched, applied and hoped to become members of this unique group of men and women in order to help preserve their heritage and history.

We received a lot of positive feedback.  The attendees asked some very good questions.

Debby and I had a great time working together.  I hope we’ll be invited to speak again on this subject, perhaps by another genealogy society.

I am not able to put a link to our presentation here on my blog.  It is in the members only section of the San Diego Genealogical Society's website.

Here though, is a list of the resources that Debby and I included with our presentation.  The links won't be live, but you could download this list and enter the links manually.  Usually sites pop up pretty quickly without you having to type the entire URL.


Here is a link to upcoming presentations sponsored by SDGS. There are some good ones coming up.  All are free and most are for anyone, whether a member or not.

Here’s the link to the calendar page SDGS upcoming events 

Happy hunting,

Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2010-2020   Diane Gould Hall

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Thursday, July 9, 2020

MAYFLOWER SOCIETY –Episode 5–An update on my application process and a link to a presentation

I wrote my last post about my journey to join the Mayflower Society, in December 2019.  I thought I would give you a quick update.

If you want to read my previous posts about my journey to join the society please click here Mayflower Society

My completed application package was mailed on 27 Jan 2020.  The approval process in Plymouth is said to take 3-5 months in normal situations.  One thing we can say about 2020, it hasn’t been normal. 

The process for everything can be delayed in these unusual times we are living in.  Reviewing and approving society applications is no different.  It’s been over 6 months now and I still have no word. 

However, I completely understand.  I have heard that they are known to be up to applications that were submitted in December 2019.  Mine can’t be too far behind, since it should have arrived in Plymouth the last days of January or first days of February.

I’d like to say I’m waiting patiently…………but, I’m pretty much checking my mail all the time to see if there is an envelope from the Mayflower Society.  I even have our mail lady (who’s the best ever) on the lookout.  Our boxes are 3 miles from our house so we don’t check the mail each day.  She says she’ll text me if she sees anything from the Mayflower Society. 

I continue to be hopeful that I will hear back soon.

In the meantime, my friend and fellow blogger Debby Warner Anderson (Debby’s Family Genealogy Blog) and I are co presenting to the San Diego Genealogical Society this Saturday, July 11th at 10 a.m. via Zoom.  Our topic ~ How to Find Your Mayflower Passenger AncestorThis presentation is open to all, so if you’d like to register to attend, here is the link https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_TCv4jvm1RyWqedWT42mZ-A 

You’ll be among the first to know, when I get that envelope in the mail.

Happy hunting,

Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2010-2020   Diane Gould Hall

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Monday, July 6, 2020

MOTIVATIONAL MONDAY ~ One thing leads to another–my husband’s FISHER line–his 8th great grandparents….and wait! Also a link to the MORSE line?


This is not the first time that I've discovered who someone's parents were in a round about way.  It's always a fun journey.  Here's how it happened this time.

While I was working on my post for Jeremiah Hall, Jr. who died in the Revolutionary War at the tender age of 16 – you can read that post here REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIER JEREMIAH HALL, JR. - Killed in Action when he was 16 yrs. old,  I began looking at the FISHER line that is connected to the HALL line.  In doing so I saw new Ancestry hints pop up.  One of those hints was from a book called The Fisher genealogy: record of the descendants of Joshua, Anthony and Cornelius Fisher of Dedham, Mass., 1630-1640.  I immediately recognized the name Cornelius Fisher.  You all know we have those hundreds of names running around in our heads and it helps us when we are reviewing any document or book.

There on page 10 was Cornelius Fisher’s name AND all of Anthony Fisher’s children (I already had Anthony Fisher as the father of Cornelius Fisher, Sr) AND the name Daniel MORSE.

Why did Daniel Morse’s name pop out at me?  Because I know there is a Daniel Morse in my husband’s family line, back about the correct time and in the correct place. 

First though, I looked at this entire page to see if I’m right in my assumption that this is "my husband's" Fisher line.

(click on this image to enlarge it)

I find the following entry:

Children by first wife and born in England;

  • Anthony, m. Joanna Faxon, Sept. 7, 1674
  • Cornelius, m. 1st Leah Heaton and 2d Sarah Everett (this is an exact match to what I have in my tree)
  • Nathaniel, m. Esther Hunting, Dec. 26, 1649
  • Daniel, m. Abigail Marriot, Nov. 16, 1641
  • Lydia, m. Daniel Morse of Sherborn [Morses’s Sherborn, p. 178; Morse Memorial, p 20]
  • John, d. in Dedham, July 15, 1638

I quickly went into my office aka the Genie Cave and opened Legacy.  There she was Lydia Fisher married to Daniel Morse.  My entry had both of them dying in Sherborn, Massachusetts.  OK, this is good. 

Oh, look at that!  I have no parents listed for Lydia Fisher.  I hadn’t yet done enough research on her, to be able to add her parents.  Now I can link her to Anthony Fisher and Mary Buckingham as her parents and show her as a sister to Cornelius Fisher, Sr.

Since Anthony Fisher and Mary Buckingham are my husband’s direct line – 8th great grandparents I want to know more about them.  This Fisher book is going to tell me more.  It will be up to me to verify and find evidence for the entries in the book.  But, isn’t that the fun part?

I hope this post has motivated you to keep checking those hints on Ancestry or whatever site your using. 

Off I go to research.  I hope to be sharing more about the Fisher line in the near future.

I always enjoy hearing from others who are researching the same lines I am.  Please get in touch, if that applies to you.

Happy hunting,

Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2010-2020   Diane Gould Hall

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

Saturday, July 4, 2020

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIER JEREMIAH HALL, JR–Killed in Action when he was 16 yrs old–24 Jan 1776

Today I’d like to honor a young man who fought and died for our independence during the Revolutionary War.

His name was Jeremiah Hall, Jr.  He was the son of Dr. Jeremiah Hall (1722-1807) and Elizabeth Bailey (1727-1816). Jeremiah was one of 7 children born to this couple.  Five daughters and two sons.

The senior Jeremiah Hall also served in the Revolutionary War for the Continental Troops, as a doctor.1

What little information I can find about young Jeremiah is his birth record and his death and burial record.  I have tried to locate his service record on Fold3 and Ancestry, but have not located it…yet.
Jeremiah was born 20 Dec 1759 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Colonial Massachusetts.  Here is a written record of his birth and an index.

(Click on any image to enlarge it)
Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988
Name:    Jeremiah Hall
Event Type:    Birth
Birth Date:    20 Dec 1759
Birth Place:    Pembroke, Massachusetts
Father Name:    Jeremiah Hall
Mother Name:    Elizabeth
Page 32


Jeremiah was the fourth child and first son, born to Dr. Jeremiah and his wife.  He had three older sisters, Dorothy age 6, Lawrentia age 4 and Lucretia age 2.  Along comes Jeremiah to fill the house with the inevitable sounds of a new baby and later the noise of a little boy.  Did his sisters dote on him I wonder?  Or was some of the usual sibling rivalry in play between the three girls and this new comer?  They didn’t have too long to think about it because the next child, another son they named Bailey, was born 2 1/2 years later in 1761, followed by two more sisters, Sarah and Lucinda.

Along comes the fight for independence and young Jeremiah signs up.  Did he tell his parents or did he just go and sign up?  What would they have thought?  He was so young and there was the usual danger of fighting in any military situation.  Especially against the British.  Afterall, they were a centuries old army, well trained and used to battle.  Not farmers and blacksmiths, store clerks and teenage boys, like those in this young country. 

I’d like to find the military records for Jeremiah.  I will keep digging online.  But, I will search in earnest when I next visit the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

The next records I have for this young man, are related to his death.
Here are the two indexes.  Note his age is listed as 17 because the birth date gives only a year.  But having his exact birth date, put his age at death as 16 years, 1 month and 4 days.

Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988
Name:    Jeremiah Hall Jr
Event Type:    Death
Birth Date:    abt 1759
Death Date:    24 Jan 1776
Death Place:    Pembroke, Massachusetts
Death Age:    17
Father Name:    Jeremiah Hall
Mother Name:    Elizabeth Hall


Massachusetts, Compiled Birth, Marriage, and Death Records, 1700-1850
Name:    Jeremiah Hall Jr
Gender:    Male
Death Age:    17
Event Type:    Death
Birth Date:    abt 1759
Death Date:    24 Jan 1776
Death Place:    Pembroke, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
Father:    Jeremiah Hall
Mother:    Elizabeth Hall



The entry in this index of Pembroke Deaths states: Hall, Jeremiah Jr., s. Dr. Jeremiah and Elizabeth, Jan 24, 1776, a. 17, “In the service of his country, opposing Brita’s Tryanny & Britain’s Tyrant.” G.R.I.  (I have transcribed it exactly as it was entered)

You may visit Jeremiah’s memorial on FindAGrave here #142810511.  I have requested a photograph of his headstone, if there is one.  I hope there is.

I am grateful to this young man and all those who fought in our war for independence.  RIP

If you have a connection to this family, I’d love to hear from you.
 
Was young Jeremiah encouraged to join the fight because of his father’s involvement?  Here is a post I wrote about a letter from Jeremiah’s father to George Washington in 1775 Dr. Jeremiah Hall writes a letter to George Washington

Sources: 1 - Ancestry.com. U.S., Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007.  Original data: Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M246, 138 rolls); War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records, Record Group 93; National Archives, Washington. D.C.

OTHER POSTS ABOUT THIS FAMILY THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST
Happy hunting,
Michigan Girl

Copyright ©  2010-2020   Diane Gould Hall

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.  NO USE WITHOUT PERMISSION